Catching | Ophea Teaching Tools

Catching

Curriculum Expectations
7.2, 8.1, 8.2, 8.3

See the Kindergarten Program 2016 for details on the specific expectations.

Lesson Learning Goals
By the end of the lesson children will be able to:
  • demonstrate persistence while engaged in activities that require the use of both large and small muscles

  • demonstrate spatial awareness

  • demonstrate control of large muscles with equipment

  • demonstrate hand-eye coordination in movement (catch).

Facility

Gymnasium, classroom or outdoors

Equipment

Beanbags (one per child)

Safety

Inspect activity area for safe traction and eliminate potential hazards. Clearly outline the boundaries for the activity making sure there is a safe distance between the activity area and the furniture/walls. Remind children to be cautious when moving, and to be aware of personal space.

Assessment Opportunity

EL-K Team observation of children’s demonstrated application of spatial awareness using large and small muscles as well as hand eye coordination in movement (catching) can be recorded on the Anecdotal Recording Chart.

Catching Exploration

Children take a beanbag and find their own space. Consider suggesting creative scenarios for throwing and catching. Children experiment tossing and catching their own beanbag to themselves, from a low, medium and high position. Have children toss and catch in front of their chest, in front of the eyes and above their head.

Catching Tricks

Children explore “tricks” when catching their beanbag. Give children time to experiment and practice their tricks then select half the class to demonstrate their trick. The other half observes and then has a chance to also demonstrate. Give both groups time to practice some of the things they just saw.

Hot Hot Hot

Working in groups of 5 or 6, children pass a beanbag from one person to the next, pretending that the beanbag is hot and passing it quickly. After the beanbag has travelled once around the circle, children take one step back and continue passing. As children get farther apart, they toss the beanbag from person to person across the circle.

Notes to EL-K Team
  • Review the skills of catching underhand:
  • Remind children to keep their eye on the beanbag as it approaches.
  • Make a basket shape with their hands with baby fingers pointing towards each other.
  • Reach out towards the beanbag.
  • On contact absorb the impact of the catch by lowering the hands.
  • Review the skills of catching overhand:
  • Remind children to keep their eye on the beanbag as it approaches.
  • Put their hands up and in front of them.
  • Make a basket shape with their hands with thumbs pointing at each other.
  • Reach out towards the beanbag.
  • On contact absorb the impact of the catch by lowering the hands.
  • Suggest a variety of catching techniques: with two hands, with one hand, while on the spot, while on the move, with a bounce from the floor, with a partner, off the wall, at various levels, close to body parts, in front of the body, to the left and right sides of the body, with a scoop.
Catching
Connection Questions to Expand and Enhance Play
  • Why is it important to have lots of room when throwing a beanbag in the air?
  • What did you do to ensure that you caught your beanbag?
  • Why is it important to keep trying, even if you’re not successful?