Cyberbullying and Harassment | Ophea Teaching Tools

    Cyberbullying and Harassment

    Grade 5
    Lesson 2 of 4
    30 minutes
    Curriculum expectations: C2.2, C2.4, C3.2, 1.3
    Other curriculum expectations: Language - Media Literacy: 1.5
    Topics: Healthy Living
    Learning Goals
    By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

    • communicate effectively and apply decision-making, assertiveness, and refusal skills to deal with pressures pertaining to cyberbullying
    • explain how a person’s online actions, both positive and negative, can affect the feelings, stressors, self-concept, emotional well-being, and reputation of themselves and others when examining different responses from different points of view
    • apply critical and creative thinking skills to reflect on the point of view of a piece of media.
    Facility
    Classroom, Computer Lab
    Equipment List
    Minds On

    Share and clarify the lesson Learning Goals with students.

    Using whole group direct instruction, briefly review netiquette, cyberbullying and general online safety. Have students confirm their understanding of these terms and safety precautions by using the Thumbs-Up Strategy (see Notes to Teacher) and review terms if necessary.

    Using whole group discussion, review the decision-making model with students.

    Decision-Making Model

    • state the problem
    • identify the alternatives
    • evaluate the alternatives
    • make a decision
    • implement the decision

    In pairs, ask students to review Emily’s situation from Part 1 of the Connect[ED] video. Ask students to categorize specific elements of her chat room dilemma, using the decision-making model.

    Decision-Making Model:

    • state the problem - Emily wants to stay logged on as Kim in the chat room so that she can find out what Lisa thinks of her. She wants to pretend to be Kim, but isn’t sure she should do it
    • identify the alternatives – Emily pretends to be Kim or Emily chooses to sign Kim out of the chat room
    • evaluate the alternatives from different points of view
    1. Emily pretends to be Kim: Emily could never approach Lisa about what she might say because she was pretending to be Kim. Kim could find out that Emily pretended to be her, and they would no longer be friends. She is breaking Kim’s trust. Emily could lose both of her friends and she might get a bad reputation at school. Their teachers might find out and she could be in a lot of trouble at school
    2. Emily chooses to sign Kim out of the chat room: She keeps her friends and keeps the trust between them in tact. No one gets hurt. Emily will feel better about herself for doing the right thing. Avoids getting into serious trouble where her parents, principal, police are involved
    • make a decision – Emily chooses to sign Kim out of the chat room
    • implement the decision

    Teacher prompt: “What refusal or assertiveness skills would Emily need to demonstrate to effectively implement her decision?”

    Student response: “She would need to be assertive with her inner self and refuse the opportunity to log on as Kim.”

    Teacher prompt: “How might this situation be stressful for Lisa if Emily had logged on as Kim? How could Lisa deal with her stress?”

    Student response: “Lisa would feel betrayed by her friends. Lisa could talk to a caring adult.”

    Teacher prompt: “Did the video offer a scenario that presented a balanced point of view with respect to online safety?”

    Student response: “Yes, the video provided alternative points of view and provided reasoning for each.”

    A&E - Minds On

    Teacher observation of students’ ability to apply decision-making, assertiveness, and refusal skills to deal with pressures pertaining to cyberbullying, and their ability to examine and explain different points of view, relating to how a person’s online actions, both positive and negative, can affect themselves and others and their reputation, and how well students communicate with others when faced with peer pressure using Resource 11: Internet Safety Decision Making Anecdotal Recording Chart

    Action

    Introduce Part 2 of the Grade 5 Connect[ED] video episode to the class. Inform students that they will be watching the characters, Anthony and Jamie, in the video having to deal with making difficult decisions online. Encourage students to think about the decision-making model for each of the scenarios in the video as they watch Part 2 of the Grade 5 episode: Your Life Online - Making Good Decisions. For a synopsis of Part 2 of the video (see Teacher Resource 9: Making Good Decisions Online Synopsis).

    Brainstorm with students the definition of harassment and discuss with students how harassment online is like harassment in real life. See Notes to Teachers for a definition of harassment

    View Part 2 of the Grade 5 Connect[ED] video.

    Explain to students that they are going to be given the scenarios from the Connect[ED] video that they just viewed. Let students know that in each of the scenarios, the character is faced with making a difficult and stressful decision, just as Emily was in the last example. Explain that they will be expected to use the decision-making model in order to analyze the scenarios from two different points of views. Refer to the Emily example to clarify for students if needed.

    In addition, each group will be responsible for creating a 5 frame storyboard (a storyboard is a graphic organizer that allows students to use sketches and written descriptions to organize their ideas). Each frame of the storyboard should reflect one of the stages of the decision-making model. The students will be responsible for showing the stages of the decision-making process that their assigned character had to go through.

    Divide students into groups of 4 or 5.

    Hand out Student Resource 16: Photo Shopping Dilemma and Student Resource 17: Harassing Emails to the groups (one scenario per group).

    Students should read the scenario, apply the decision-making model and then answer the questions attached to each scenario. Then decide who will take on each point of view and defend their decisions. Students will then show their character's decision-making process on the 5 frame storyboard including the refusal or assertiveness skills required to properly implement their decision.

    Students work on scenarios and 5 frame storyboard.

    Have students act out their scenarios to the class, presenting both points of view.

    A&E - Action

    Teacher observation and feedback of students’ ability to make good decisions in tough situations, and communicate effectively when pressured by peers to make a choice that could negatively impact others when online using Teacher Resource 11: Internet Safety Decision Making Anecdotal Recording Chart

    Consolidation

    Discuss with students which decision was the best one for each scenario and why.

    Teacher prompt: “We know that when we’re feeling stressed talking to a caring adult can help. Why were the students in each scenario afraid to tell an adult, especially their parents, about the situations they were in?”

    Student response: “They were afraid their parents/guardians would be mad, take away their computer, or restrict their use of the Internet. They could get into a lot of trouble, or get grounded.”

    Teacher prompt: “Would you be afraid to tell your parents if you were in any of these situations? Why? Why is it important to tell an adult?”

    Student response: “I wouldn’t be afraid to tell my parents. I might be concerned that they might not understand and want to take away my computer privileges. However, if I have not done anything wrong and am unfortunately being bullied online, I am confident they would understand and realize that it is not my fault and would try to help me.” “Telling an adult is important because they can assist you in dealing with the situation and following the right process. So, even if you are concerned about telling your parents, you should remember that they love you and want you to be safe online.”

    Teacher prompt: “Now think beyond the story content to the big picture of the video. Did the second part of the video offer scenarios that presented a balanced point of view with respect to online safety?”

    Student response: “Yes, the video provided alternative points of view and provided reasoning for each.”

    Explain to students that in the next few lessons, they will be creating a brochure about netiquette and cyberbullying using all of the information they have learned, so that other students can be more informed. Ask students to think about what the purpose of a brochure is? Where have they seen brochures? Tell them these questions will be further discussed next class.

    A&E - Consolidation

    Teacher observation and feedback of students’ ability to make good decisions in challenging situations, communicate effectively when being pressured by peers to make a choice that could negatively impact others when online and to examine the point of view of a piece of media using Teacher Resource 11: Internet Safety Decision Making Anecdotal Recording Chart

    Ideas for Extension

    Have students create their own online scenarios. Trade their scenarios with others and use the decision-making model to analyze the situation.

    Next Steps

    Students will continue to analyze various cyberbullying scenarios and they will have to use their decision-making skills to assess how to handle the situations. Students will use the information learned in the last two lessons to create a brochure.

    Notes to Teacher

    Thumbs Up Strategy: A strategy used for students to self assess their understanding of a specified goal. Thumbs up = understand, Thumbs Sideways = working on it/almost there, Thumbs Down = I have more questions.

    Harassment The Ophea Health and Physical Education (H&PE) Curriculum Resources: Grades 1-8 (2010) defines harassment as a form of discrimination that may include unwelcome attention and remarks, jokes, threats, name-calling, touching, or other behaviour (including the display of pictures) that insults, offends, or demeans someone because of his or her identity. Harassment involves conduct or comments that are known to be, or should reasonably be known to be, offensive, inappropriate, intimidating, and hostile.

    Additional Resources

    For additional resources and websites please see the Additional Teacher Supports section of the Connect[ED] website.