Assessment When Evaluating and Drawing Conclusions | Ophea Teaching Tools

    Assessment When Evaluating and Drawing Conclusions

    Student Reflection Questions When Evaluating and Drawing Conclusions

    Educators may use the following questions to prompt students to reflect on their actions in the Evaluate and Draw Conclusions component:

    • What big ideas have you learned or better understood?
    • What does the evidence tell you about the question being investigated?
    • What conclusions can be drawn at this point in the inquiry process?
    • Does the evidence support your initial position or not?
    • How are your ideas changing?
    • Is there anything new you’ve learned that you would change or add to your stance/position?
    • Is there anything else you might need to investigate to support your stance?

    Assessing When Students are Evaluating and Drawing Conclusions

    Evaluating information and drawing conclusions are processing skills linked to the Living Skills from the Ontario Health and Physical Education curriculum and found in the Thinking section of the Achievement Chart 1. Students can use several ways to demonstrate the learning of these skills as related to the Health and Physical Education curriculum expectations, including:

    • Graphic organizers
    • Educator or peer conferencing
    • Exit cards
    • Reflection questions

    Success Criteria When Students are Evaluating and Drawing Conclusions

    Educators develop the success criteria with students to create a common understanding of what each component involves. The co-constructed description may be different in each class, but a list of possible success criteria for this component is given below. Not all criteria are appropriate for all grades, courses, or inquiry. Each of the following success criteria should be linked to Health and Physical Education curriculum expectations.

    • I can develop a fitness plan using data collected about my current level of fitness (e.g., exertion level, participation level, etc.).
    • I can combine multiple pieces of information about my heart rate, participation, and exertion levels to help set a goal.
    • I can revise my goals as needed based on new information and data obtained.
    • I can modify my strategies to adjust to a game situation (e.g., windy, playing defence).
    • I can compare and contrast two or more tactics.
    • I can critique the performance of a movement skill (peer-assessment, video of myself, visual diagrams of the skill) according to set criteria.
    • I can evaluate my performance of a movement skill and make adjustments to improve my performance.
    • I can choose which strategy is the best to use in different game situations.
    • I can incorporate different pieces of gathered information into my action plan.
    • I can use self-assessment information to identify adjustments that may be necessary in my fitness plan.
    • I can make connections between my ideas and the ideas in the evidence.
    • I can evaluate information to make a decision, make a choice, or find a solution.
    • I can create possible explanations based on a set of data.
    • I can form my own conclusions from reading various viewpoints about a topic.
    • I can look at a problem/issue from various perspectives and suggest a solution.
    • I can weigh pros and cons and consider consequences to make decisions in a variety of situations.

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    1 Ontario Ministry of Education. (2015a). The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 1 to 8: Health and Physical Education, 2015 (Rev. ed.). Retrieved from http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/curriculum/elementary/health1to8.pdf. Ontario Ministry of Education. (2015b). The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 9 to 12: Health and Physical Education, 2015 (Rev. ed.). Retrieved from http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/curriculum/secondary/health9to12.pdf