Facilitating Learning to Communicate | Ophea Teaching Tools

    Facilitating Learning to Communicate

    Skills Students Need to Learn and Develop

    To support student learning to Communicate, a variety of skills are needed. These skills include:

    • Consolidating new knowledge in a variety of oral, written, and visual formats
    • Using proper vocabulary and terminology in both the subject content and inquiry-based learning
    • Appropriately addressing a particular audience
    • Communicating for different purposes
    • Using presentation skills (e.g., speaking clearly, audible voice, making eye contact)
    • Providing positive feedback and asking questions as a member of an audience
    • Using self-awareness and self-assessment strategies to share and make suggestions for improvement in future presentations

    Educator Tips to Facilitate Student Learning for Communicating

    To support the Communicate component, educators may consider using the following implementation recommendations:

    • Teach students inquiry vocabulary and model its use frequently throughout all the stages of the inquiry process.
    • If multimedia products are one of the choices for sharing the learning, plan class time for students to learn how to use the app, software, etc.
    • Identify audience when starting an inquiry so students can shape how they’ll share early on. Using the phrase “sharing out loud” rather than “presenting” may alleviate stress for younger students.
    • Small group sharing may be more appropriate and efficient for younger students or to scaffold practicing communication skills.
    • Build in class time for practice/peer assessment of presentations and revisions.
    • Post and refer regularly to anchor charts or word walls with the vocabulary used in inquiry-based learning.
    • Arrange students so everyone can see each other in the class or activity area (e.g., U shape or circle).
    • Allow a student to “pass” but let them know they need to later give an answer or in some way follow up with you one-on-one.
    • Consider the use of words/tone when providing feedback during a game or in debriefs, coaching situations, or strategy discussions.
    • Allow 3–5 seconds wait time between asking a question and calling on a student.
    • Post 1–2 key questions the day before the discussion to allow students who require more thinking time to be able to contribute to the conversation the next day.

    Sample Curriculum Connections for Learning to Communicate

    With differentiated instruction and varying amounts of support, many of the strategies identified in Figure 14 can be used at all age/grade levels. For example, many of the examples at secondary are also applicable for many elementary students.

    Figure 14: Sample Curriculum Connections for Communicating

    Active Living

    What Can It Look Like

    • Elementary
      Students create a visual of their effective communication choice after inquiring about using effective verbal and non-verbal communication in the activity area setting.
    • Secondary
      Students report on the effectiveness of CPR at various time intervals after beginning CPR.

    Curriculum Connections

    1.3 - communicate effectively, using verbal and non-verbal means, as appropriate, and interpret information accurately as they participate in physical activities, develop movement competence, and acquire knowledge and skills related to healthy living

    Grade 5 A3.1 - demonstrate behaviours and apply procedures that maximize their safety and that of others during physical activity

    Grade 9 A3.3 - demonstrate an understanding of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) techniques and when and how to use them [CT]

    Movement Competence

    What Can It Look Like

    • Elementary
      Students create a non-verbal mirroring sequence to demonstrate the results of an inquiry in a dance unit.
    • Secondary
      Students take turns adopting the role of coach to give feedback to their peers to help them execute a serve more efficiently in a volleyball game after an inquiry on the phases of movement.

    Curriculum Connections

    1.3 - communicate effectively, using verbal and non-verbal means, as appropriate, and interpret information accurately as they participate in physical activities, develop movement competence, and acquire knowledge and skills related to healthy living

    Grade 6 B1.2 - perform a wide variety of locomotor movements, in combination, at different speeds, in different directions, and using different pathways, while moving around others and/or equipment [PS, IS]

    Grade 12 B1.3 - demonstrate an understanding of the phases of movement and apply this understanding to refine skills as they participate in a variety of physical activities, with an emphasis on individual and lifelong activities [PS, CT]

    Healthy Living

    What Can It Look Like

    • Elementary
      Students can identify what a bystander could do or say when someone calls another person names. (For example, students can practise effective oral responses to someone who directs a homophobic slur to them or another student.)
    • Secondary
      Students perform role-plays using refusal skills to deal with potentially challenging situations involving illicit use of drugs.

    Curriculum Connections

    Grade 4 C1.3 - describe various types of bullying and abuse, including bullying using technology, and identify appropriate ways of responding [IS]

    Grade 7 C2.2 - assess the impact of different types of bullying or harassment, including the harassment and coercion that can occur with behaviours such as sexting, on themselves and others, and identify ways of preventing or resolving such incidents [IS, CT]

    Grade 10 C2.3 - demonstrate the ability to analyse situations involving conflict within oneself or conflict with others and apply appropriate conflict resolution strategies [PS, IS, CT]

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