Facilitating Learning to Interpret and Analyse | Ophea Teaching Tools

    Facilitating Learning to Interpret and Analyse

    Skills Students Need to Learn and Develop

    To support student learning to Interpret and Analyse, a variety of skills are needed. These skills include:

    • Analysing data, evidence, information, skills, or strategies using list of criteria
    • Interpreting data, evidence, and/or information in graphs, charts, photographs, and videos
    • Finding patterns or relationships in data, evidence, and/or information collected
    • Determining whether data, evidence, and/or information collected is relevant and/or useful to purpose
    • Connecting data, evidence, and/or information collected with previous knowledge (e.g., use a KWL or RAN chart)
    • Examining and assessing print and digital sources for currency, bias, accuracy, and reliability

    Educator Tips to Facilitate Student Learning for Interpreting and Analysing

    To support the Interpret and Analyse component, educators may consider using the following implementation recommendations:

    • Model how to interpret information in graphs, videos, photographs, etc. by thinking aloud, asking and answering questions about the visual.
    • Use questions to guide students in determining when enough evidence has been collected (e.g., Have you considered all perspectives? Do you have enough information to create a plan?).
    • Use templates to help students evaluate their information/sources.
    • Understand that this component can be difficult for students and requires developed critical-thinking skills. Additional support may be required through differentiated instructional strategies and tools to support student learning.

    Sample Curriculum Connections for Learning to Interpret and Analyse

    With differentiated instruction and varying amounts of support, many of the strategies identified in Figure 11 can be used at all age/grade levels. For example, many of the examples at secondary are also applicable for many elementary students.

    Figure 11: Sample Curriculum Connections for Interpreting and Analysing

    Active Living

    What it can look like

    Students interpret and analyse information (e.g.,heart rates, run times, steps walked, or fitness assessment results) to help develop a personal fitness plan and make connections between active living and personal fitness.

    • Elementary
      Students analyse personal data (primary source) and data from resources (secondary sources) to determine where they are at, where they need to go and how to get there, with respect to personal fitness plans.
    • Secondary
      Students examine their fitness assessment results to identify their strengths and limitations in order to set goals as they develop, implement and revise a personal fitness plan.

    Curriculum Connections

    1.5 - use a range of critical and creative thinking skills and processes to assist them in making connections, planning and setting goals, analysing and solving problems, making decisions, and evaluating their choices in connection with learning in health and physical education

    Grade 6 A2.3 - assess their level of health-related fitness as they participate in various physical activities and monitor changes in their physical fitness over time [PS, CT]

    Grade 10 A2.4 – develop, implement and revise a personal fitness plan [PS,CT]

    Movement Competence

    What it can look like

    Students can analyse movement skills, use of tactics, or choice of offensive and defensive strategies

    • Elementary
      Students determine what tactics work best when performing a variety of movement skills and concepts, which requires the interpretation of information/data that was collected (e.g., varying the speed of movement or the path of locomotion).
    • Secondary
      Students explore and analyse which tactics work best in different situations and which strategies are similar in activities within a games category (e.g., When would you spike vs. tip the ball? What are some important movement concepts that transfer from when you play volleyball to when you play badminton?).

    Curriculum Connections

    1.1 - use self-awareness and self-monitoring skills to help them understand their strengths and needs, take responsibility for their actions, recognize sources of stress, and monitor their own progress, as they participate in physical activities, develop movement competence, and acquire knowledge and skills related to healthy living

    Grade 5 B1.3 - explore different combinations of locomotor movements with and without equipment, alone and with others, moving at different speeds and levels, and using different pathways [PS, IS]

    Grade 12 B2.2 - apply analytical and problem-solving skills to identify and implement tactical solutions that will increase their chances of success as they participate in a variety of physical activities, including individual activities, sports and/or recreational activities [PS,IS,CT]

    Healthy Living

    What it can look like

    • Elementary
      Students examine and respond to various scenarios. Students assess the level of potential danger and rank the scenarios from the most dangerous to the least dangerous based on student-generated success criteria.
    • Secondary
      Students are given an article, a YouTube video and an infographic about various factors to examine and compare with respect to the influence of social factors on food and beverage choices.

    Curriculum Connections

    1.5 - use a range of critical and creative thinking skills and processes to assist them in making connections, planning and setting goals, analysing and solving problems, making decisions, and evaluating their choices in connection with learning in health and physical education

    Grade 8 C2.2 - demonstrate the ability to assess situations for potential dangers, and apply strategies for avoiding dangerous situations [CT]

    Grade 9 C3.1 - analyse the influence of social and environmental factors on food and beverage choices [IS, CT]

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